Welcome to Manx BirdLife

Kittiwakes – Maughold – June 2008. Photo: Pat Cullen

Welcome to Manx BirdLife’s website. Manx BirdLife is a charity based in Laxey in the Isle of Man. It works to conserve the Isle of Man’s wild birds and their habitats through advocacy and by raising public awareness of conservation issues.  We base our work on sound scientific research and actively seek partnerships to better achieve conservation goals.

To send us any observations of birds on the Isle of Man, please click on the ‘Your Sightings’ box on the right of this page.

To contact Manx BirdLife, click on CONTACTS at the top of the screen. Click on RECENT REPORTS for recent Manx bird sightings. Please join the Manx BirdLife mailing list by entering your details in the boxes at the right of the page.

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Dora and Sophie – End to End walk, Sunday 21st September

Training session_Dora & Sophie

Dora and Sophie – raising funds for Manx BirdLife

The End to End walk takes place on Sunday! Dora Querido and Sophie Costain are taking part, raising money for Manx BirdLife. If you want to support them please follow this link.

The distance from the Point of Ayre to the Sound is 39.22 miles. Any support you can give them will be most welcome!

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Week ending 14th September 2014 – bird reports on the Isle of Man

For full details of the sightings during week ending 14th September, click here.

They can also be seen by clicking on ‘RECENT REPORTS’ at the top of the screen, go down to ‘September’, then clicking on ‘14th‘.

The total number of species reported in 2014 by the end of this week remains 162, as no new species were reported during the week. See here for the full list of what has been reported. If you see a species that has not yet been reported this year, please do tell us about it using the usual form.

Many thanks for the all the observations and photos sent in. Please continue to send in your observations and photographs using this form.

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The Fiend of Fistard

By Norman Edwards, Guest blogger and MBL Data entry volunteer
Fiend of Fistard 1

Who me? (by Norman Edwards)

 

Along with Herring Gulls, Hooded Crows are among the species that can became most troublesome when cohabiting with humans. Despite the inconvenience, one has to admire them for their plasticity, the capacity that species have to adapt to new or to a wide range of different habits. Herring gulls have found that the roofs of modern houses are a safe place to nest and they use chimneys as advantages points. Hooded Crows, according to Norman’s experience below, might look at contemporary gardens like a playground.

 

Here he is, the Fiend of Fistard, the Hooded Menace resident in our garden and the fir copse next door for the last five or six years. Innocent? Don’t you believe it! We don’t feed him but someone local does as he buries food in caches in our lawn. Well-fed with no need to forage, he obviously has the time on his hands, or should that be wings, to lurk around causing cause mayhem in his territory – our garden.

Quite apart from terrorising local woodpigeons, blackbirds, sparrows and other small birds, and tapping on windows at dawn or earlier, he also wrecks things!

Crow Damage 1

His favorite game: messing about with soil! (by Norman Edwards)

Pots and containers, window ledges, car windscreen mirrors and windscreen wipers, despite naga chilli paste applied as a deterrent. His prize win, though, was when he took to rolling small stones from the apex of our two-storey roof onto our cars. Result – one smashed windscreen!

I’m very fond of crows, I used to keep a rescue crow as a pet, but this blighter has gone too far. Every attempt to deter him has failed so I’m now looking at trapping and relocation!

Does anyone want him in their garden?

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Manx bird sightings for week ending 7th September 2014

For full details of the sightings during week ending 7th September, click here.

They can also be seen by clicking on ‘RECENT REPORTS’ at the top of the screen, go down to ‘September’, then clicking on ‘7th‘.

The total number of species reported in 2014 by the end of this week was at 162, with one new species being reported during the week: a Kingfisher on the Sulby River in Ramsey. See here for the full list of what has been reported. If you see a species that has not yet been reported this year, please do tell us about it using the usual form.

Many thanks for the all the observations and photos sent in. Please continue to send in your observations and photographs using this form.

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Why has Sophie decided to walk 39 miles in 10 hours ?

By Sophie Costain, Manx BirdLife Data Assistant
A) She needed a reason to get fit (and lose weight).
B) The charity she is walking for needs funds.
C) She wanted to raise the charity’s profile.
D) Because it’s just a great thing to do!
 
Sophie_swinging seat

The tempting swinging seat

A) She needed a reason to get fit (and lose weight).

 I have learnt over the years that I am not very dedicated. All my good intentions of joining the gym, going for jogs or even doing stretches every day have always faded into nonexistence within about two days of my initial burst of enthusiasm.

Excuses range from “I need to cook tea” to “I’ll do it tomorrow”.  A definite attitude change was needed plus a good source of inspiration to push me out of my laziness. What can be better than knowing that you can help the charity you work for in both raising funds and awareness whilst increasing your fitness levels and maybe helping your attempt to lose weight? Count me in!

Indeed it was working the way I had planned at first, helping me to shift the extra pounds I’d put on whilst at Glastonbury festival, but a recent holiday to France has just about ruined all of that through a combination of too much cheese and croissants and a very nice swinging seat in the sun that was a lot more tempting than going for a walk. I am back now but perhaps not doing as much training as I should be, however panic mode will kick in very soon and I’ll do a lot more.

B) The charity she is running for needs funds.

20140727_122016

Enjoying the landscape…

Working in the office for two days a week has shown me how money has to be utilized to maximum effect in a charity and I have seen future visions for Manx BirdLife where money will be needed in the future, such as developing the charity’s first nature reserve at the Point of Ayre Gravel Pits. After four months working with antiquated computers, which took longer to load an email than it did to boil the kettle, leading to overconsumption of tea, I could see a complete overhaul of the computer system was needed and is one thing the funds raised will help pay for.

C) She wanted to raise the charity’s profile.

As Dora said in her blog about the challenge, most people on the Isle of Man are unaware of Manx BirdLife’s existence and the work that it does for wild birds. Every bit of publicity helps, and the charity will certainly need a bigger profile if it is to fulfill its ambitions to grow and achieve even more in the future. In the short term, a raised profile on the island will hopefully lead to more people submitting their bird sightings to provide crucial records for the database.

D) Because it’s just a great thing to do!

As a born and raised Manx woman I have seen the competitors of the parish walk year after year and more recently people walking in the end to end walk, but so far I have never taken part in either event.

Training session_Dora & Sophie

Our first training session together: we walked from Point of Ayre to Kirk Michael (15.5 miles in 4.5 hours)

I am a big walker and love going out for countryside walks. But timed walks over a long distance have never appealed to me, and I thought that it may take the enjoyment out of it. Through going on training walks around the Island I do admit to feeling a sense of satisfaction in seeing your speed and distance increase with less effort. It will definitely be an achievement to say that I have walked from one end of the Island to the other. 

So how is the training going?

As mentioned previously I am probably not doing as much as I originally planned, but the training I have done is helping me to feel positive. Apart from a very sore ankle after walking fifteen miles in the wrong type of shoes because I’m an idiot, some aching muscles and a blister on my ankle, my body is coping well with the long distances and speed in training. It is yet to be seen if I can keep up the pace for the whole thirty nine miles but, ever the optimist, I am saying I will. I’ll certainly be giving it my best shot!

Want to Sponsor us?

Visit our online campaign here

or

Send your contributions to our Office: 35 New Road, Laxey, Isle of Man, IM4 7BG

Day: 21st of September 2014
Time: 8 am
Place: Isle of Man – starting at the Point of Ayre (a place very dear to Manx BirdLife as we are hoping to have a nature reserve there) and ending at the Sound.

 

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